Irish immigration the gilded age essay

The Merchant of Venice was their first performance, shown initially on September 15, Most likely, the first plays written in America were by European-born authors—we know of original plays being written by Spaniards, Frenchmen and Englishmen dating back as early as —although no plays were printed in America until Robert Hunter's Androboros in

Irish immigration the gilded age essay

Immigration was nothing new to America. Except for Native Americans, all United States citizens can claim some immigrant experience, whether during prosperity or despair, brought by force or by choice. However, immigration to the United States reached its peak from The so-called "old immigration" brought thousands of Irish and German people to the New World.

Many would come from Southern and Eastern Europe, and some would come from as far away as Asia. New complexions, new languages, and new religions confronted the already diverse American mosaic. Most immigrant groups that had formerly come to America by choice seemed distinct, but in fact had many similarities.

Most had come from Northern and Western Europe. Most had some experience with representative democracy. With the exception of the Irish, most were Protestant.

Many were literate, and some possessed a fair degree of wealth.

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The new groups arriving by the boatload in the Gilded Age were characterized by few of these traits. None of these groups were predominantly Protestant. The vast majority were Roman Catholic or Eastern Orthodox. However, due to increased persecution of Jews in Eastern Europe, many Jewish immigrants sought freedom from torment.

Very few newcomers spoke any English, and large numbers were illiterate in their native tongues. None of these groups hailed from democratic regimes. The American form of government was as foreign as its culture.

The new American cities became the destination of many of the most destitute. Once the trend was established, letters from America from friends and family beckoned new immigrants to ethnic enclaves such as Chinatown, Greektown, or Little Italy. This led to an urban ethnic patchwork, with little integration.

The dumbbell tenement and all of its woes became the reality for most newcomers until enough could be saved for an upward move. Despite the horrors of tenement housing and factory work, many agreed that the wages they could earn and the food they could eat surpassed their former realities.

These so-called "birds of passage" simply earned enough income to send to their families and returned to their former lives. Not all Americans welcomed the new immigrants with open arms.

While factory owners greeted the rush of cheap labor with zeal, laborers often treated their new competition with hostility. Many religious leaders were awestruck at the increase of non-Protestant believers.

Racial purists feared the genetic outcome of the eventual pooling of these new bloods.

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Gradually, these "nativists" lobbied successfully to restrict the flow of immigration. InCongress passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, barring this ethnic group in its entirety.

Irish immigration the gilded age essay

Twenty-five years later, Japanese immigration was restricted by executive agreement. These two Asian groups were the only ethnicities to be completely excluded from America.

Criminals, contract workers, the mentally ill, anarchists, and alcoholics were among groups to be gradually barred from entry by Congress.

InCongress required the passing of a literacy test to gain admission. Finally, inthe door was shut to millions by placing an absolute cap on new immigrants based on ethnicity. That cap was based on the United States population of and was therefore designed to favor the previous immigrant groups.

But millions had already come. Each brought pieces of an old culture and made contributions to a new one. Although many former Europeans swore to their deaths to maintain their old ways of life, their children did not agree.

Irish immigration the gilded age essay

Most enjoyed a higher standard of living than their parents, learned English easily, and sought American lifestyles.The Gilded age refers to the brief time in American History after the Civil War Restoration period. The Gilded Age derived its name from the many great fortunes that were created during this period.

During this time, the United States experienced a population and economic boom that led to the creation of an incredibly wealthy upper class. Gilded Age- Immigration During the ’s immigration patterns changed significantly, the new immigrants came from southern and eastern Europe.

Immigration during the Gilded Age by Olivia prezi on Prezi

Unlike before when most had come from the British Isles and western Europe. Immigration was nothing new to America. Except for Native Americans, all United States citizens can claim some immigrant experience, whether during prosperity or despair, brought by force or by choice.

However, immigration to the United States reached its . The Gilded age refers to the brief time in American History after the Civil War Restoration period. The Gilded Age derived its name from the many great fortunes that were created during this period.

During this time, the United States experienced a population and economic boom that led to the creation of an incredibly wealthy upper class. Irish Immigrant Letters Home By using The Curtis Family Letters, students explore the reasons for Irish emigration from Ireland and the impact that immigration had on the family.

Students learn about the hardships in Ireland . JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources.

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