The five forms of power

For some, power is seen as corrupt. For others, the more power they have, the more successful they feel.

The five forms of power

Coercive Power This form of power is based upon the idea of coercion. This means that someone is forced to do something against their will.

The main objective of coercion is compliance. This form of power illustrates what happens when compliance is not obtained. According to French en Raven there are also other forms of power that can be used in a coercive manner such as withholding rewards or expertise or using referent power to threaten social exclusion.

The force of power is also associated positively with punitive behaviour and negatively associated with conditional reward behaviour. This form of power often leads to problems.

In many cases this form of power is abused. Coercive power can lead to unhealthy behaviour and dissatisfaction at work.

Leaders who use this leadership style rely on threats in their management styles. Often these threats relate to dismissal or demotion.

Reward Power This type of power involves the ability of individuals to delegate matters they do not wish to do to other people and to reward them for this. This form of power is based on the idea that as a society we are more inclined to do things well when we are getting something in return for this.

The most popular forms are raises, promotions or compliments. The problem with this form of power is that when the reward does not have enough perceived value to others, the power is weakened.

One of the frustrations when using rewards is that they often need to be bigger than the last time if they are to have the same effect.

Even then, when they are given regularly, employees can become satiated by the rewards and as a result, they will lose their effectiveness. Legitimate Power This form of power gives the ability to link certain feelings of obligation or notion of responsibility to the management.

Rewarding and punishing employees can be seen as a legitimate part of the formal or appointed leadership role. Most managers in organizations execute a certain degree of reward and punishment. Legitimate power is usually based on a role.

People always run with the pack and traditionally obey the one person with power which is solely based on their position or title. This form of power can easily be overcome as soon as someone loses their position or title.

French and Raven's Five Forms of Power

This power is a weak form to persuade and convince other people. Referent Power This form of power is about management based on the ability to administer to someone a sense of personal acceptance or approval.

The five forms of power

The leader in this form of power is often seen as a role model. Their power is often treated with admiration or charm. This power emanates from a person that is highly liked and people identify strongly with them in some way.Key Points.

The five forms of power

French and Raven's Five Forms of Power attempts to determine what it is that makes someone powerful in a given setting. Reward Power is typically financial when talking about a leader within a company, for example the ability to reward your team members with things like bonuses or . Jun 29,  · Organizations are made up of individuals that exercise power.

Sometimes, authority stems from a person's title or from specialized knowledge. Others . Organizations are made up of individuals that exercise power. Sometimes, authority stems from a person's title or from specialized knowledge. Others exercise power through interpersonal relationships.

The governance of nations differs significantly based on who has power. This lesson will differentiate five forms of government: monarchy, democracy, oligarchy, authoritarianism, and totalitarianism.

The Five Forms of Teacher Power One mostly implicit element of the classroom reality is the way that power is manifested in any class. Feeling some degree of power is a basic human need.

In , French and Raven described five bases of power: Legitimate – This comes from the belief that a person has the formal right to make demands, and to expect others to be compliant and obedient.

The 5 Types of Power in Leadership